The Audio Visual Exhibition






With the two hour long ambient epos “The Fifty Eleven Project” by Kasper Bjørke Quartet as the soundtrack, the visual artist and director Justin Tyler Close engages into an audio-visual non verbal dialogue with two narrative layers: One man’s struggle with cancer and anxiety while facing his own mortality versus mankind’s impact on planet Earth.

In a poetic, visually striking and fantastic tale exploring the major themes of mankind: Birth, love, fear, death and rebirth, told through 11 chapters on 11 screens, with the 11 compositions as the soundtrack, the venture covers the spectrum of life through one man’s existential struggle after a cancer diagnosis.

Close explores the significance of time, and when you’re faced with your own mortality, we start to view life through a new lens; whether that’s chasing a 5 year old version of ourselves, or imagining what it would be like to grow old - or the fear of losing everything we love - utilizing the darkly beautiful but ultimately empowering and autobiographical soundtrack of Kasper Bjørke Quartet. Exquisitely recorded, arranged and produced, it twinkles like stars in the cosmos and is expansively infinite, but also vaporous like phosphorescent cosmic dust. In other places it’s dramatic and pensive, like an impending one-way exile into a black hole.

We join our protagonist on his odyssey before, during and after his cancer diagnosis, from the darkness of anxiety and fear of relapse to the healing light from his loved ones and pure relief of being cured, while finally accepting his own mortality and connection with his own destiny and with nature. There’s a transition from tension and anxiety to a elestial release through the soundtrack and the captivating images by Justin Tyler Close and cinematographer Snorre Ruhe.

In a deeper sense, on a surreal, metaphoric level, Close explores a not so unrealistic thought: That mankind is the cancer of planet Earth, that we’re on the brink of destroying our only home, and that to save ourselves we need to reconnect with nature.